Korean War Veteran receives replacement medals after 60 years

“For your service and for your family, just in case they need to know that you gave service to the nation and that there has been a sacrifice made,” said Cory, as she handed the medals to Doyle.

Homer Lee Doyle, a Korean War veteran with the United States Air Force, was surrounded by his family at his home in Hornsby for what he thought was a family outing. Doyle was informed by his daughter they were going out to eat and for him to be ready. However, Doyle, and his wife Lynn, were surprised with an out of town visitor who came bearing an unexpected gift.            Andrea Lynne Cory, military advocate and founder of The Real Army Wives out of North Carolina, arrived with Bolivar Bulletin-Times’ news reporter Amelia Monroe Carlson and additional news media. Carlson had discovered Doyle had his military medals stolen during a home burglary in the late 1950’s and worked with Cory, The Real Army Wives, government and military officials, in order to get replacement medals for Doyle.            “For your service and for your family, just in case they need to know that you gave service to the nation and that there has been a sacrifice made,” said Cory, as she handed the medals to Doyle. The medals were contained in a wooden case which bears the Air Force logo on top with the American flag and Air Force flag on the sides.            Doyle said the replacement medals were a surprise but something that will long be cherished by him, as well as his family.            “I can’t begin to tell you how excited I am about the whole day and in receiving the medals,” said Doyle. “Whoever did it, I want to thank them very much.”            Doyle said the medals were a reminder of his time in the war and his service to the nation.            “There’s so many others who did so much more. I never talked much about what I did to get the medals. I didn’t deserve the medals,” said Doyle. “It’s something that you get while you’re there. You don’t have to do anything except be there.”            However, Cory said it was his sacrifice of giving up his time in order to serve that was important and needed to be recognized. She said the medals, like other military medals families, will become a family treasure.            “Military medals are a piece of a family’s history,” said Cory. “I am glad we were able to get these back for the Doyles.”            Lynn Doyle, Doyle’s wife, shed tears as the medals were handed to Doyle. She said the tears were a result of her pride in her husband.            “These tears I shed are tears of pride,” said Lynn Doyle. “I can’t explain it, it’s such a wonderful feeling.”            Doyle served in the Air Force for four years and worked at the supply base during the war. He said he was also responsible for transporting prisoners of war.  The medals were stolen from his mother’s home just a few years after he returned from the war, and 60 years later, he has received new medals.